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before this whole nsa story first erupted. is this announcement today in the east room a political necessity for the president? >> i think it is, brooke. i think the president's got to do a better job explaining to the american public why this nsa surveillance program exists. because there are a lot of skeptical people including in his own party among the democrats. why does the united states government need to do all this, go through all these -- have this massive program collecting information on everyone's phone numbers, e-mails. even though there is a process, legislative process, judicial process to make sure it isn't in violation of people's privacy, a lot of americans don't believe that. they're very nervous about it. they toedon't like it. i think the president recognizes and certainly his aides recognize they have to do a better swrjob explaining the necessity of this in the war against terrorism, if you will. i think that's what the president hopes to do. score some points and reassure the american public their privacy is being protected. >> right. wolf and jessica, thank
the question is it possible some of your sources were using you to justify the nsa, coverage of the nsa program or to kind of obscure human intelligence, assets, and saying it was signals intelligence? >> sure, first to fran's point it's totally true this is one of many and one piece of information in a broad collection that the u.s. intelligence community has engaged in. this meeting was significant according to officials and reports in both "the new york times" and lots of other outlets because it was where the vague discussion of impending attack was discussed and if you look at the embassy closings around the world it matches the people on the call. so you can sort of understand why the u.s. government took such a broad approach. as for it being motivations in taking the risk, i can't speak to that. some of them they take risks on. this seems to be a risk they didn't take. as far as some of the other reporters linking this to the nsa and snowden and what have you, it's important to point out the programs disclosed by snowden are not related to this particular communication particularly inte
were using you to either justify the nsa coverage of the nsa program or to kind of obscure human intelligence, assets and saying it was signals intelligence. >> sure. first to fran's point. it is true it is one of many threat streams and one piece of information in a broad mosaic of a collection that the u.s. intelligence community is engaged in on a regular basis but the meeting was significant according to officials and reports in the "new york times" mcclatchy and other outlets because it is where the vague discussion of impending attack was discussed. if you look at the embassy closings around this world it largely matches the people who were on the call according to to our reporting. you can understand why the u.s. government took a broad brush aproechl as for it being their motivations in taking the risk, i can't speak to that. i would say some communications they hold closely. some they take risk on. this seems to be a risk they didn't take as far as other reporters linking it to the nsa and snowden and what have you. it is important to point out the programs disclosed by
, we do so. >> safe to say that we learned about these threats through the nsa program? >> we have some mechanisms where we can track a phone number or an e-mail address that we know is connected to some sort of terrorist threat. and, you know, that information is useful. but, what i've said before, i want to make sure i repeat. and that is, we should be skeptical about the potential encroachments on privacy. none of the revelations show that government has abused these powers, but they're pretty significant powers. and i've been talking to congress and civil libertarians and others about are there additional ways that we can make sure that the people know. no one is listening to your phone call. >> were you surprised that russia granted snowden asylum? >> i was disappointed. because, you know, even though we don't have an extradition treaty with them, traditionally we have tried to respect if there's a law breaker or an alleged law braeaker in their country. we evaluate it and we try to work with them. they didn't do that with us and in some ways it's reflective of some underlying chal
the surveillance said it was fundamentally different than what they were led to believe as the nsa sweeped up thousands of e-mails from americans with absolutely no ties to terrorism. amid growing controversy comes more revelations the national security agency illegally collected tens of thousands of americans' e-mails. new declassified documents show the nsa collected nearly 60,000 communications a year for three years ending in to 11, it includes e-mails and other internet activity. the court also said the nsa misrepresented the scope of its effort. >> very disturbing, a national security agency has extraordinary surveillance capabilities and these tools are supposed to be directed toward adversaries in the united states, not toward the american public. >> reporter: the nsa says it collected the data by mistake. senior intelligence official telling reporters there was a "technological problem that could not be avoided rather than any overreach." meantime intelligence officials are denying a media report that the nsa sifts through and has access to 75% of online communications in the u.s. th
to ease americans' doubts about the massive nsa surveillance programs and outlined the series of reforms and they include working with congress to restructuring the secret court to the declassification of some nsa activities and outside experts to review computer spy technology. i want to welcome someone else from afar and the assistant democratic leader in the house. last month he joined forces with conservative republicans in a failed effort to defund the surveillance program. congressman, first of all, thank you so much for being there. i wanted to ask you, first of all, if what the president said in any way made you feel easier or more comfortable about this program in particular the phone data that is collected on every american? >> first of all, thank you so much for having me, candy. yes, but i felt that way before. as you know, the president spoke out on this issue long before snowden and i was very comfortable with the president's position on this. it's just that every now and then you catch a vote in order to let your constituents know and for your colleagues to know exactly ho
. so you can. >>> the father of nsa leaker edward snowden says he's not saying when he will visit russia. edward snowden has been charged in federal court with violations of the espionage act. >>> new articles gifl giving a fresh perspective of the march in washington for jobs and freedom at the height of the civil rights movement. the saturday evening post covered civil rights extensively in the '50s and '60s and has released a column called "it's our country, too" and it's about how the march actually began a full 22 years earlier with the protests that were planned but never actually happened. joining me now is jeff neilson as well as james peterson, professor of studies at lehigh university and an msnbc contributor. gentlemen, good to have you both here. thank you for joining us. >> thank you, alex. >> jeff, the retrospective article includes the discussion with walter white. what happened there? talk about what happened all the way back to 1940 and people have to remember what time this was. this was a full year before pearl harbor, a much different time. >> that's right. at
, a new report from the "new york times." see this this morning? it says the nsa is tracking all messages into and out of the united states. we're going to break that down with our legal panel, next. the great outdoors... ...and a great deal. thanks to dad. nope eeeeh... oh, guys let's leave the deals to hotels.com. ooh that one! nice. got it! oh my gosh this is so cool... awesome! perfect! yep, and no angry bears. the perfect place is on sale now. up to 40% off. only at hotels.com >>> if you text or e-mail someone overseas, there is a good chance the government is combing through what you've written. today's "new york times" first reported today that the government spying is possibly more pervasive than we actually thought. the "times" says nsa computers are searching texts and e mai-m going in and out of the country. looking for certain words, information on suspected terrorists. the government's already acknowledged it monitors suspect communications, but according to "the new york times," most every text or e-mail that crosses the u.s. border is searched for key words. that said, join
to nsa leaker edward snowden. my next guest said it's the right direction but can't undo five years the president spent remaking the image into one perceived around the globe as weak. fox news contributor linda chavez. thanks for joining us this morning. >> great to be with you. >> i think a lot of people voted for president obama in 2008 the first time with the sincere expectation his election would make america more popular around the globe. that hasn't happened. why? >> it hasn't happened. the president said he was going to remake america's image in the world. i think a lot of people thought because he did have a charismatic personality, certainly the president himself believes himself to be charismatic, he was going to be able to win more friends for america, that america would suddenly be beloved by all. what the president seems not to understand, what is most important in terms of a country's standing is that you are respected not necessarily liked. so the president's effort to make everyone like us i think has made us look weak. >> so it's had the opposite effect? >> that's e
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)

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